Tag Archives: blogging

How To Handle Negative Comments On Your Blog

Whose blog is it anyway?
Whether you have a blog on your professional website, or just a personal one that you maintain for yourself and a few interested readers, you should have a set of rules in place to handle negative comments and bad behavior. It’s your place: blog, journal or website, it’s your spot on the web, your home, your showcase.

Your place, your rules — which also means you also have to have rules, or else watch on the sidelines as anarchy takes over. Your blog is a place that invites comments and discussions — a comments policy helps prevent the nasties from defacing your work and ruining the conversations you want to happen.

Guests may comment — the purpose of a blog is to foster discussion after all — but people who post inflammatory, inane or vile stuff may as well have sprayed graffiti all over your walls.

This is where a comment policy comes in handy. Everyone comes in knowing the rules and those who don’t follow them can leave or be made to leave. Boors, trolls and asshats may be invited to tone it down or be forcibly booted out– this is the point where comment moderation and deletion comes in handy.

 

What is your SOP regarding comments on your website? Whatever rules you come up with, you have to make them clear,and visible.

 

Clear rules are important because you need strong protections to weed out the unwanted elements sure to wander in on your home space. And it’s not just the rude people you want gone, you also need to address the comments they leave behind: like nasty, spiteful ‘presents’ you’ll want to contain as soon as possible.

  • With no clear rules, chaos reigns.
  • You make the rules, you can’t expect people to follow them if you don’t enforce them.
  • You don’t follow your own rules, you’ve just eaten into your own authority.

It’s that simple. Now, what are unacceptable behaviors you won’t tolerate on your blog?  List them down and work on codifying them. Continue reading How To Handle Negative Comments On Your Blog

Editing For Blogs And Business Management

 Edit – from the Latin edo, editus – “bring forth; bring about.”

When we say the word ‘edit’, the meaning is taken to suggest “taking away’ or ‘whittling down’, and that’s true when it comes to writing.

Editing in a blogging contexts means taking out the parts that don’t quite scan, refining the whole, and preparing the article so it will present a coherent, cohesive message.

But, adding the original meaning of ‘bringing (something) forth” , a slightly different angle reveals itself. Refining means removing the extraneous parts to reveal the essential structure beneath.

For instance, paring down an article to remove filler, awkward sentences and unrelated ideas helps make the core message clearer by bringing it out from under all that obscuring material.

Editing, in nearly all contexts, makes it easier to get a bead on things. Clutter –mental or physical –doesn’t get in the way of vision, and you can focus better on fewer items.

When life today seems to be on a perpetual treadmill chasing after just-this-one-more-thing-to-do-right-NOW, rendering things to their cleanest, simplest forms can help you find a sense of balance, control and even gratitude in your life.

Editing and blogging
Blogging is textual sharing, and as can happen with any kind of sharing, things can get in the way: irrelevant details, awkward sentence construction or run-on sentences, etc.

Editing is refining the message so you end with the best presentation you can have: the message exactly as you want to say it.

You present knowledge into linked concepts– specially crafted passages that act like bullets aimed right at eliminating problems, or resolving issues, or stating a particular call to action.

Editing as a practice leads to precision sniping, and leading away from a scatter-shot approach, helps get the message delivered every time. Continue reading Editing For Blogs And Business Management

What Makes For Good Content?

You know, what with the running theme we had these few weeks about content — making it, spreading it around and marketing it (and marketing with it) — we may have looked past some things that are so simple we take them for granted.

  • Content is messages. You got something to say, and you share it. People can listen or read, and respond.
  • Content calls for engagement, response and reaction.
  • Content is giving form to your thoughts, or voice to your words, and sharing that. Content calls for sharable media in a public forum.
  • Online content is intent captured in ink and pixels: to share, to sell, to uplift, to inform, to teach, to show.
  • Content differs with each creator, but all content-creators want to feel their voice being heard, and to have registered with their audience.
  • Content needs an audience to resonate with.

We are a story-telling race. We tell stories to make sense of the world, to explain things, to teach. We use stories to call attention, incite, and educate. From the first cave-drawing to the little flash-ads scrolling on your screen, people want to get their message across. It’s in our nature.

Now the internet has given us a multitude of platforms on which to stand, and a very big bullhorn with which to reach our audiences. Content is words, and art, and sound, and video. Content lets you tell a story and helps you connect. What else is the internet but an virtual net connecting everyone through posted messages, and reactions sent back and forth? There are great watering holes where we gather to drink our fill of the information we want and need. As long as they don’t run dry, we’ll keep coming back.

What kind of content do we go for anyway?
Blogs, newsletters, and videos for daily updates. E-books, pod-casts, and e-zines to keep current. Webinars, whitepapers, and articles to educate ourselves… Whatever the platform, the content trickles into niches and targeted audiences. Whatever the niche — financial, information technology, entertainment, health and beauty, DIY crafting, self-help — the possibilities to share are endless.

Nobody knows exactly what new things will pop up in the next 5 or 10 years. That’s why we talk to one another and share things over the internet. Continue reading What Makes For Good Content?

How To Take Care of Your Blog — And Your Bloggers

If you want to have a good blog, you need to have good writers. Good writers have to create valuable, useful and distinctive content.

  • Valuable – The content shared adds to the reader’s store of knowledge: by showing old issues in a new light, or giving a new perspective to addressing a common issue or a persistent problem — all in the ultimate aim of helping the reader help himself.
  • Useful – The advice or methods shared in the article are immediately applicable, and will give positive results when put into practice.
  • Distinctive – This can refer to the writer’s style — a distinctive voice which can’t be mistaken for anyone else. Check out James Altucher’s articles on Altucher Confidential, or the recipes shared on Thug Kitchen. ‘Distinctive’ is also generally taken to mean no cookie-cutter re-branded articles, or thinly disguised SEO optimization, or click-bait (articles presented in such a way as to get clicks from interested viewers, but don’t deliver on their implied promises.)

Now, creating quality content takes time, dedication and serious brain-power. The brain power might not be in the same field as, say, calculating deep math or (insert science here) analysis, but it still is involved in problem solving. That’s what good content points to — how people can help themselves. That’s how you get content built around certain ideas, like:

  • We know you have these common issues, doing this can help.
  • How can you improve X with Y.
  • Here are X ways you can address Y.
  • Here are Z classic ways to make X work harder for you.

 

For any targeted online business there is a niche market, and for every niche market there are a sets of easily identifiable issues for which you, marketer and business owner, have tailored your business to addressing. Think of it as a higher level of FAQs, where you provide the answers to your market’s most pressing questions: How can I do this? How can I solve this? How can you help me do both? Continue reading How To Take Care of Your Blog — And Your Bloggers

Blogging Your Way To Your Market’s Attention

Social media’s power lies in numbers, in networks, and in its immediacy. One of the most popular social media platforms is the blog, and having one for your business can help you in many ways. You probably have your own favorite bloggers to follow (and blogs to visit) as there are a lot of them that have risen to the top of their niches in terms of popularity and reach, in no smart part due to the trustworthiness, value and reliability built with each post, and how bloggers engaging with their followers and subscribers.

The speedy evolution injected by the internet into our communication media exploded the ways we used to talk to each other. Snail mail was superseded by email, the numbers of long-distance calls fell once Skype was stable and running, and anyone could make their own free website — remember Geocities?

Blogging is no longer a recent phenomenon — not when you think in internet time. But it addresses the same ancient longing to make a connection, only now we can use Wi-Fi to do so. Whatever medium we use –social media, blogging platforms, networking apps and websites, we use it to connect, find information, share it, and motivate people to act on it for our benefit or on behalf of others. Continue reading Blogging Your Way To Your Market’s Attention

Free Vs. Paid Blog Hosting

01 February 2009, by A. Cedilla

To say that blogging is popular would be an understatement of near-biblical proportions.

It is currently estimated that tens of millions of readers regularly peruse an equally voluminous number of blogs. You’ve probably read about people making a mint online just by blogging.

Well-known blogmasters like Darren Rowse of Problogger, Brian Clark of Copyblogger, Trent Hamm of The Simple Dollar and Leo Babauta of Zen Habits inspired many would-be’s to carve out their own spot in the blogosphere as well.

Of course, to start logging yourself, you need to set up a blog account. You can pick between a free blogging service or a fee based service.

Continue reading Free Vs. Paid Blog Hosting

Blogging Basics: Incubating Fresh Blog Content

25 September 2008, by A. Cedilla

3rd of 3 parts

When you first start your blog, you probably have so much to say that you have no problem posting every day. After a while, you begin to run out of ideas and you can’t seem to come up with fresh content. Every blogger has this problem from time to time. It’s normal.
So how do you keep the blog going — keep it fresh and full of value? Here are some ideas:

Do a top 10 list – Bloggers and their readers love lists.

  • “The top 10 mistakes people do when trying _______ for the first time.”
  • “The top 10 reasons to pick ______.”

Lists tend to be easier to write and take less time to formulate. If you can’t come up with 10, perhaps you can make it the top 3 or top 5.

Ask an expert – Approach someone who is very knowledgeable in your blog niche and you may find they’ll be happy to do an interview, especially if they have a new product just launched and would like the exposure. Put together some thoughtful questions and ask them to write out their answers. The beauty of this blog post is that aside from asking the questions, the interviewee does all the work!
Continue reading Blogging Basics: Incubating Fresh Blog Content

Blogging Basics: Your Blogging Schedule

21 September 2008, by A. Cedilla

2nd of 3 parts

Does the idea of scheduling your blogging seem forced? Uncreative? Posting to your blog shouldn’t happen only when you feel “moved” to create an award-winning post. Blogging needs to be done regularly to provide good content for your readers, to get better at writing and to maximize your profits.

Set yourself up with a schedule to post on your blogs. Take a realistic look at your business and figure out where blogging should be on your list of priorities.

The objective is not to be constantly blogging, forsaking all else, but to bring blogging forward a bit from your low priority pile of things to do. Take a look at your business model and where blogging fits in. If your blogs are currently your only platform for making money, then naturally blogging should be high priority.

Your blogging schedule is up to you and can certainly be changed when your circumstances change. Perhaps you’re going to temporarily blog daily on your internet marketing blog because you’re promoting an affiliate product or you’re just about to launch your new ebook. On a regular week you might consider blogging everyday, but alternating between all your blogs.
Continue reading Blogging Basics: Your Blogging Schedule

Blogging Basics: Making Money Without A Website

18 September 2008, by A. Cedilla

1st of 3 parts

You’ve heard about online marketing as a way to make some extra money on the side, but you don’t have any programming skills and have nothing you can think of to sell that isn’t already being offered everywhere. Can you still become successful and make money marketing online? In a nutshell: Yes.

There are a number of ways to make money online without a website. Blogging is one.

Blogging is an activity where you make a web page (Don’t worry, you won’t need web wizard skills. Blogger, Typepad and WordPress, among others, have templates and a set-up process that takes all the guesswork out of making a blog) that you update every few days with posts about your chosen subject. Visitors can comment on your posts for others to see. You can place advertising on your blog – provided automatically by Google – and get paid whenever anyone clicks on one of those ads.
Continue reading Blogging Basics: Making Money Without A Website

Blogging Tips: Creating a Course on Your Favorite Topic 2

13 September 2008, by A. Cedilla

Part 2 of 2

In the first half of this series we covered the first three steps of the ADDIE model: analysis, design and development. In this last part, we’ll finish up with implementation and evaluation.

Implementation
This is continuing the action to completion. This is the moment you’ve waited for, finally presenting your project to the world!

Depending on your delivery format, this step is your upload, blog post, product launch, course roll-out, first class, or the day you come face to face with the learners wanting to take your course.

Evaluation

Once you’ve presented your course, regardless of the medium, you must evaluate, evaluate, evaluate! This isn’t only the evaluation of student progress in your course (which can show you if your lessons are easily absorbed or not, or how effective your approach is, among other things), but also an evaluation of YOUR content, design and delivery.

Ask these questions during your evaluation: Did the students enjoy studying my presentation? Did they reach the learning objectives? Where can I make improvements to content, activities and delivery of my course?

Continue reading Blogging Tips: Creating a Course on Your Favorite Topic 2