Monthly Archives: July 2014

How To Keep A Business Healthy For The Long Run

Framed in the simplest terms, a business is an enterprise that provides a service or a product to customers in exchange for money. Without customers, businesses would fail. And as an entrepreneur and owner of an on-line business, aside from a viable pool of customers, you also need to have a considerable repertoire of hard and soft skills to see your business through good times and bad.

What else do you need?

You need to know the core mission of your business. You can earn money doing a lot of things: sell digital art, buy and fix thrift-store furniture and resell it, run a food-truck, etc. but you need to know: what is your business here for?

Times change, and the factors that sparked the seed of life for your business can change with them. Think of Kodak — once the world leader in photographic film, it went bankrupt when it wasn’t able to adapt quickly enough to take full advantage of the rise of digital imaging technology. The company re-imagined itself and now it offers “packaging, functional printing, graphic communications and professional services for businesses around the world,” upon coming up from the ashes of its former success.

You need a long-term vision: where do you want to go with the business, and where do you want it to take you?

What you also need for your business are good relationships. Good businesses work to maintain long-term relationships with old customers, while inviting new people to join the group, and taking care of the ones who keep coming back. Solid relationships with your peers, partners and associates in your business community are also vital.

No-one ever really gets anywhere worth going to all by themselves. Help people up, build friendships, and your reward would be a supportive community, a deep sense of belonging, and the privilege of being able to give back. Continue reading How To Keep A Business Healthy For The Long Run

How To Handle Low Energy Episodes

Let’s talk about low-energy days.

You know what happens. They have dips in energy, anywhere from feeling a little blah or under the weather, to actual mental fuzziness and blanking out on important stuff.

Often these dips manifest as the flickering attention or fractured focus we get in the afternoon — usually after we tried to get by on caffeine-drips and convenience food eaten desk-side earlier in the day¬† just so we could cram in all the stuff on our to-do lists.

Low energy manifests in many ways.
Physically, when it comes to posture we can revert to a certain ‘slackness’: slumping or slouching. There’s a sense of fatigue, listlessness and generally feeling “off.”

Mentally, low energy affects how you think: like experiencing the inability to focus, or to hold a coherent and cohesive working idea for a sustained period. You skip from idea to idea without settling on what’s important. Thoughts slip out of focus. The more you try the harder it gets, like trying to hold on to water –or nailing jello to the wall. You can’t concentrate for all the ‘static’ going on in your head.

Low energy can result in slowed reaction times and less comprehension. It isn’t a coincidence that accidents happen a lot more when people are tired, and that we make more mistakes as well.

These dips and slumps in our energy levels can come up like a sudden squall, leaving you feeling like a puppet whose strings have just been slashed. They can slowly creep in and envelop you without you noticing until it’s too late, you’re already foggy and can’t decide what to do first, or next, or at all.

For example: You made plans last night, prepping for today. The list is right there in front of you, but your energy level is somewhere around your knees, your mind feels like sludge, and somehow your give-a-damn’s malfunctioned while you slept and right now, sitting at your desk and looking at what you need to do today, you just can’t care. You’re barely there.

What can you do? Continue reading How To Handle Low Energy Episodes